Rotator Cuff Tear

What is a Rotator Cuff Tear?

A rotator cuff is a group of tendons in the shoulder joint that provides support and enables a wide range of motion. A major injury to these tendons may result in rotator cuff tears. It is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain in middle-aged and older individuals.

What are the Causes of Rotator Cuff Tears? 

A rotator cuff tear may occur with repeated use of the arm for overhead activities, while playing sports, or from a motor accident.

What are the Symptoms of Rotator Cuff Tears?

A rotator cuff tear causes severe pain, weakness of the arm and crackling sensation on moving the shoulder in certain positions. There may be stiffness, swelling, loss of movement and tenderness in the front of the shoulder.

How is a Rotator Cuff Tear Diagnosed? 

Your surgeon diagnoses a rotator cuff tear based on a physical examination and X-rays. A rotator cuff tear is best viewed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

What are the Treatment Options for Rotator Cuff Tears?

Conservative treatment

The conservative treatment options for rotator cuff tears are:

  • Rest
  • Shoulder Sling
  • Pain medication 
  • Injection of a steroid (cortisone) and a local anesthetic in the subacromial space of the affected shoulder to relieve inflammation and pain
  • Exercises

Surgery for Rotator Cuff Tears 

Rotator cuff repair may be performed by open or arthroscopic surgery. In arthroscopy, the space for rotator cuff tendons will be increased and the cuff tear is repaired using suture anchors. These anchor sutures help in attaching the tendons to the shoulder bone. Following the surgery, you may be advised to practice motion and strengthening exercises.

SLAP Tears

Anatomy of the Shoulder

The shoulder joint is a ball and socket joint. A ball at the top of the upper arm bone (humerus) fits neatly into a socket, called the glenoid, which is part of the shoulder blade (scapula). The glenoid is surrounded by a ring of fibrous cartilage called the labrum for stabilization of the shoulder joint. The biceps tendon attaches inside the shoulder joint at the superior labrum of the shoulder joint. It is a long cord-like structure that attaches the biceps muscle to the shoulder and helps to stabilize the joint.

What are SLAP Tears?

The term SLAP (superior –labrum anterior-posterior) lesion or SLAP tear refers to an injury of the superior labrum of the shoulder. 

What are the Causes of SLAP Tears? 

The most common causes include falling on an outstretched arm, repetitive overhead actions such as throwing and lifting a heavy object. Overhead and contact sports may put you at a greater risk of developing SLAP tears.

What are the Symptoms of SLAP Tears?

The most common symptom is a pain at the top of the shoulder joint. In addition, a catching sensation and pain most often with activities such as throwing may also occur.

How are SLAP Tears Diagnosed? 

Diagnosis is made based on the symptoms and a physical examination. A regular MRI scan may not indicate a SLAP tear and therefore an MRI with a contrast dye injected into the shoulder is usually ordered. The contrast dye helps to highlight SLAP tears.

What are the Treatment Options for SLAP Tears? 

  • Your doctor may recommend anti-inflammatory medications to control pain. In athletes who want to continue their sports, arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder may be recommended.
  • Depending on the severity of the lesion, SLAP tears may simply require debridement or some may need to be repaired. A SLAP repair can be performed using arthroscopic techniques that require only two or three small incisions.
  • Regular exercises that make the shoulder muscles strong should be done. Adequate warm-up exercises before activities and avoiding high contact sports can help prevent injuries that cause instability.

 

GLENOID LABRUM TEAR

The glenoid is a shallow cavity of the shoulder blade (scapula). The ball-shaped head of the upper arm bone (humerus), articulates with the glenoid to form the ball-and-socket joint of the shoulder joint. A soft tissue called the labrum surrounding the socket further stabilizes this joint so that the humerus head fits snugly in the cavity. The labrum can get injured by falling on an outstretched arm, lifting a heavy object or from a direct blow to the shoulder. Weightlifters and throwing athletes are at a high risk of glenoid labrum tears.
The condition may be associated with other injuries such as shoulder dislocation. Depending on their location, they can be categorized as a SLAP lesion or Bankart lesion (above or below the middle of the glenoid).

What are the symptoms of glenoid labrum tear?

Symptoms of a glenoid fracture include shoulder pain while lifting your arm, at night or with everyday activities, swelling, catching or popping of the arm, instability and inability to move the arm.

How is a glenoid labrum tear diagnosed?

When you present to the clinic with these symptoms, your doctor will perform a thorough physical examination and order X-rays, or CT or MRI scans to determine the extent of the fracture and displacement of the joint. To confirm the diagnosis, arthroscopy is performed, where a narrow lighted tube with camera (arthroscope) is inserted into the joint through a tiny incision to view the damage clearly.

What are the treatment options?

Non-displaced fractures require immobilization in a sling for about six weeks. Your doctor usually prescribes medication to relieve pain and inflammation. When these non-surgical approaches to treatment do not relieve symptoms, surgery may be recommended, where the tear is either removed or repaired with absorbable sutures, wires or tacks. Associated damage to the surrounding tendons or ligaments is also repaired.

Rotator Cuff Tear

What is a Rotator Cuff Tear?

A rotator cuff is a group of tendons in the shoulder joint that provides support and enables a wide range of motion. A major injury to these tendons may result in rotator cuff tears. It is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain in middle-aged and older individuals.

What are the Causes of Rotator Cuff Tears? 

A rotator cuff tear may occur with repeated use of the arm for overhead activities, while playing sports, or from a motor accident.

What are the Symptoms of Rotator Cuff Tears?

A rotator cuff tear causes severe pain, weakness of the arm and crackling sensation on moving the shoulder in certain positions. There may be stiffness, swelling, loss of movement and tenderness in the front of the shoulder.

How is a Rotator Cuff Tear Diagnosed? 

Your surgeon diagnoses a rotator cuff tear based on a physical examination and X-rays. A rotator cuff tear is best viewed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

What are the Treatment Options for Rotator Cuff Tears?

Conservative treatment

The conservative treatment options for rotator cuff tears are:

  • Rest
  • Shoulder Sling
  • Pain medication 
  • Injection of a steroid (cortisone) and a local anesthetic in the subacromial space of the affected shoulder to relieve inflammation and pain
  • Exercises

Surgery for Rotator Cuff Tears 

Rotator cuff repair may be performed by open or arthroscopic surgery. In arthroscopy, the space for rotator cuff tendons will be increased and the cuff tear is repaired using suture anchors. These anchor sutures help in attaching the tendons to the shoulder bone. Following the surgery, you may be advised to practice motion and strengthening exercises.

RECURRENT ROTATOR CUFF TEAR

The rotator cuff consists of muscles and tendons that connect the arm to the shoulder blade. Tears in this network of muscles and tendons may occur due to overuse of the shoulder, injury, lack of blood supply, bone spurs, and normal wear and tear of the joint, causing pain and disability. A torn rotator cuff can usually be repaired by suturing it to its original position. However, tears can recur even after surgery.

Recurrent rotator cuff tears especially occur with large tears. Problems in the surgical technique or during the healing process may also contribute to its recurrence. These may include pulling out of the sutures placed during surgery to hold the soft tissue together due to high tension, minor contractions that occur in the muscle even during post-surgical immobilization, patient non-compliance to post-surgery instructions, and changes in the properties of the tendon depending on the duration of time from when it was torn. Apart from these, advanced age, general health, presence of other diseases and medications may also play a part in re-tears.

Persistent pain, loss of function and shoulder movement several months following surgical repair is usually an indication of a recurrent rotator cuff tear. Sometimes, recurrent tears are asymptomatic and show up during your periodic follow-up visits to your doctor. At these visits, your doctor will review your history and physically examine the shoulder for motion, function and strength. It is very important to determine the exact cause of the failed surgical repair. Ultrasound imaging studies may be ordered to evaluate the integrity of the rotator cuff tendons as they heal and placement of the sutures.

Your doctor will first suggest conservative treatment with rest, activity modification, using a sling, physical therapy to improve the strength and stability of the joint, and steroid injections to relieve pain and swelling.

If symptoms do not resolve, repeat surgery will have to be considered. Depending on the type of tear, surgical treatment may include removing frayed tendon ends and re-suturing the tendon if it is healthy. A damaged biceps tendon, which helps in the movement of the elbow, may also be repaired. A tendon transfer may have to be done if the tendon has extensive tears. If the quality of the bone is not adequate, joint replacement (hemiarthroplasty or reverse shoulder arthroplasty) using metal and plastic prostheses may be considered.

The post-operative phase is critical with surgical treatment of recurrent rotator cuff tears. A slow and steady rehabilitation program under the guidance of a physical therapist giving the repaired tendons sufficient time to heal will yield a better outcome compared to a more aggressive physical therapy program.

Articular Cartilage Injury

Articular Cartilage

Articular or hyaline cartilage is the tissue lining the surface of the two bones in the knee joint.  Cartilage helps the bones move smoothly against each other and can withstand the weight of the body during activities such as running and jumping. Articular cartilage does not have a direct blood supply to it so has little capacity to repair itself. Once the cartilage is torn it will not heal easily and can lead to degeneration of the articular surface, leading to the development of osteoarthritis.
 
The damage in articular cartilage can affect people of all ages. It can be damaged by trauma such as accidents, mechanical injury such as a fall, or from degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis) occurring in older people.

What are the treatment options for articular cartilage injury?

Patients with articular cartilage damage experience symptoms such as joint pain, swelling, stiffness, and a decrease in range of motion of the knee. Damaged cartilage needs to be replaced with healthy cartilage and the procedure is known as cartilage replacement. It is a surgical procedure performed to replace the worn out cartilage and is usually performed to treat patients with small areas of cartilage damage usually caused by sports or traumatic injuries. It is not indicated for those patients who have advanced arthritis of the knee.
 
Cartilage replacement helps relieve pain, restore normal function, and can delay or prevent the onset of arthritis. The goal of cartilage replacement procedures is to stimulate the growth of new hyaline cartilage. Various arthroscopic procedures involved in cartilage replacement include:

  • Microfracture
  • Drilling
  • Abrasion Arthroplasty
  • Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI)
  • Osteochondral Autograft Transplantation

Microfracture: In this method, numerous holes are created in the injured joint surface using a sharp tool. This procedure stimulates a healing response by creating a new blood supply. Blood supply results in the growth of new cartilage.
 
Drilling: In this method, a drilling instrument is used to create holes in the injured joint surface. Drilling holes creates blood supply and stimulate the growth of new cartilage. Although the method is similar to microfracture, it is less precise and the heat produced during drilling may damage other tissues.
 
Abrasion Arthroplasty: High-speed metal-like object is used to remove the damaged cartilage. This procedure is performed using an arthroscope.
 
Osteochondral Autograft Transplantation: Healthy cartilage tissue (graft) is taken from the bone that bears less weight and is transferred to the place of the injured joint. This method is used for smaller cartilage defects.
 
Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation: A cartilage tissue (graft) is taken from a donor and transplanted to the site of the injury. Allograft technique is recommended if a larger part of cartilage is damaged.
 
Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation: In this method, a piece of healthy cartilage from another site is removed using the arthroscopic technique and is cultured in a laboratory. Cultured cells from a larger patch which is then implanted in the damaged part by open surgery.
 
Following the surgery, rehabilitation procedures are advised to necessitate healing and to restore the normal functioning of the joint.

ROTATOR CUFF ARTHROPATHY

The rotator cuff consists of 4 muscles that stabilize the ball and socket joint of the shoulder during movement. Large tears in the rotator cuff can lead to joint instability and slipping of the ball (end of the upper arm bone or humerus) out of the socket (the glenoid fossa of the shoulder). Over time, this leads to a condition called rotator cuff arthropathy, which is a form of wear-and-tear arthritis caused by the rubbing of the ball against the outer rim of the glenoid.

Symptoms of rotator cuff arthropathy include pain, swelling, loss of motion, loss of strength, a sensation of grinding or catching of the joint, shoulder dislocation and muscular atrophy. Overhead activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing and eating become increasingly difficult.

Diagnosis of a rotator cuff arthropathy will be based on your history and physical examination for restriction in range of motion or muscular atrophy. X-rays may be ordered to evaluate the joint for any bony abnormality or a high riding shoulder, which is a sign of a torn rotator cuff. MRI and CT scans may also be ordered to confirm the diagnosis.

Non-surgical treatment options include ice, heat, anti-inflammatory medications, steroid injections, and physical therapy with the goal being to preserve range of motion and stability. Surgical treatment options may include:

Arthroscopic debridement: Any damaged soft tissue or bony fragment is removed, and partial repair of the torn rotator cuff may be performed.

Reverse shoulder replacement surgery: The damaged ball and socket regions of the joint are removed and replaced by artificial components. Instead of replacing with similarly shaped components, the ball-shaped prosthesis is implanted at the glenoid cavity and the cup-shaped prosthesis is implanted at the end of the upper arm bone. This provides better stability and functionality without the need for a rotator cuff.

Following surgery, your hand may be placed in a sling. Physical therapy rehabilitation may begin the day after surgery to gradually improve your range of motion. Electrical stimulation and massage may also be helpful.

Rotator Cuff Tear

What is a Rotator Cuff Tear?

A rotator cuff is a group of tendons in the shoulder joint that provides support and enables a wide range of motion. A major injury to these tendons may result in rotator cuff tears. It is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain in middle-aged and older individuals.

What are the Causes of Rotator Cuff Tears? 

A rotator cuff tear may occur with repeated use of the arm for overhead activities, while playing sports, or from a motor accident.

What are the Symptoms of Rotator Cuff Tears?

A rotator cuff tear causes severe pain, weakness of the arm and crackling sensation on moving the shoulder in certain positions. There may be stiffness, swelling, loss of movement and tenderness in the front of the shoulder.

How is a Rotator Cuff Tear Diagnosed? 

Your surgeon diagnoses a rotator cuff tear based on a physical examination and X-rays. A rotator cuff tear is best viewed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

What are the Treatment Options for Rotator Cuff Tears?

Conservative treatment

The conservative treatment options for rotator cuff tears are:

  • Rest
  • Shoulder Sling
  • Pain medication 
  • Injection of a steroid (cortisone) and a local anesthetic in the subacromial space of the affected shoulder to relieve inflammation and pain
  • Exercises

Surgery for Rotator Cuff Tears 

Rotator cuff repair may be performed by open or arthroscopic surgery. In arthroscopy, the space for rotator cuff tendons will be increased and the cuff tear is repaired using suture anchors. These anchor sutures help in attaching the tendons to the shoulder bone. Following the surgery, you may be advised to practice motion and strengthening exercises.

ARTHROSCOPIC ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR

Rotator cuff is the group of tendons in the shoulder joint providing support and enabling wider range of motion. Major injury to these tendons may result in tear of these tendons and the condition is called as rotator cuff tear. It is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain in middle-aged adults and older individuals. It may occur with repeated use of arm for overhead activities, while playing sports or during motor accidents. Rotator cuff tear causes severe pain, weakness of the arm, and crackling sensation on moving the shoulder in certain positions. There may be stiffness, swelling, loss of movement, and tenderness in the front of the shoulder.
Rotator cuff tear is best viewed on magnetic resonance imaging. Symptomatic relief may be obtained with conservative treatments – rest, shoulder sling, pain medications, steroidal injections and certain exercises. However, surgery is required to fix the tendon back to the shoulder bone.

How is the procedure performed?

Surgery to repair the rotator cuff has traditionally been done through a large shoulder incision, about 6-10cm long, and the muscle over the rotator cuff was separated. Newer, advanced surgical techniques have been developed to minimize pain and recovery time. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a minimally invasive surgery performed through tiny incisions, about 1 cm each, with an arthroscope.
The arthroscope is a small fiber-optic viewing instrument made up of a tiny lens, light source and video camera. The surgical instruments used in arthroscopic surgery are very small (only 3 or 4 mm in diameter) but appear much larger when viewed through an arthroscope.
The television camera attached to the arthroscope displays the image of the joint on a television screen, allowing the surgeon to look throughout the shoulder-at cartilage, ligaments, and the rotator cuff. The surgeon can determine the amount or type of injury, and then repair or correct the problem.

What are the benefits of arthroscopic surgery?

The benefits of arthroscopy compared to the alternative open shoulder surgery, include:
• Smaller incisions
• Minimal soft tissue trauma
• Less pain
• Faster healing time
• Lower infection rate
• Less scarring
• Earlier mobilization
Usually performed as outpatient day surgery

SLAP Repair

Shoulder Anatomy

Your shoulder joint is a ball and socket joint made up of the upper arm bone, the shoulder blade, and the collarbone. The head of the upper arm bone fits into the socket of the shoulder joint known as the glenoid cavity. The outer edge of the glenoid is surrounded by a strong fibrous tissue called the labrum. 

What is a SLAP Tear?

A superior labrum anterior and posterior tear or SLAP tear is an injury to the labrum. This injury may also involve the biceps tendon, which is attached to the top part of the labrum. The injury occurs from repeated use of the shoulder while throwing or a fall onto the shoulder. 

What is a SLAP Repair?

A SLAP tear can be treated through an arthroscopic surgical procedure called a SLAP repair. 

What are the Indications for a SLAP repair?

A SLAP repair is indicated to treat the torn labrum of the shoulder socket when conservative treatment measures such as NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications) and physical therapy do not relieve the symptoms of a SLAP tear. 

How is a SLAP Repair performed?

A SLAP repair is a minimally invasive surgery that uses an arthroscope, a tube with a light and camera on the end that projects images onto a monitor for your surgeon to view inside your joint. The type of SLAP repair depends on the type of tear involved and will be determined once your surgeon views the joint. The procedure is performed under general anesthesia and a nerve block. 

  • Your surgeon first makes small incisions to insert the arthroscope and thin surgical instruments into the shoulder joint. 
  • Your surgeon will then identify the type of SLAP tear and remove the damaged tissue of the labrum.
  • A small hole is then drilled into the bone of the shoulder socket close to the labral tear. 
  • Your surgeon will place an anchor into the drilled hole with a strong suture.
  • Additional anchors can be placed as required for securing the torn labrum to the bone of the shoulder socket. 
  • Finally, the torn labrum is tied to the bone with the sutures. 

What are the Steps Recommended for Postoperative Care following SLAP Repair?

After the procedure, your arm will be placed in a sling for the first 3 weeks to immobilize the shoulder joint and you will be advised to restrict active motion of your shoulder for about 6 weeks. You will be instructed to take your pain medications and apply ice packs to control swelling and pain. The plaster strips over the wounds should be kept dry until the wounds heal. Through physical therapy, you can slowly regain motion and strengthen the shoulder. You can resume sports activities after consulting with your physical therapist and surgeon. You should avoid driving for a few weeks after the surgery. 

What are the Advantages of SLAP Repair?

A SLAP repair involves the reattaching of the labrum to its normal anatomical position; thereby, restoring the anatomy of the shoulder. The procedure also allows the normal functioning of the previously damaged labrum and biceps attachment. 

What are the Associated Risks and Complications of SLAP Repair?

As with any surgical procedure, SLAP repair may involve certain potential risks and complications including:

  • Infection 
  • Excessive bleeding
  • Blood clots
  • Shoulder stiffness 
  • Injury to nerves or blood vessels

Arthroscopic Bankart Repair

Shoulder Anatomy

The shoulder joint (glenohumeral joint) is a ball and socket joint, where the head of the upper arm bone (humerus) attaches to the shoulder socket (glenoid cavity). The shoulder socket is extremely shallow and therefore needs additional support to keep the shoulder bones from dislocating. The labrum, a cuff of cartilage that encircles the shoulder socket, helps serve this purpose by forming a cup for the humeral head to move within. It provides stability to the joint, enabling a wide range of movements.

What is a Bankart Tear?

The labrum can sometimes tear during a shoulder injury. A specific type of labral tear that occurs when the shoulder dislocates is called a Bankart tear. This is a tear to a part of the labrum called the inferior glenohumeral ligament and is common in the young who sustain a dislocation of the shoulder. A Bankart tear makes the shoulder prone to repeat dislocation in patients under 30 years of age.

How is a Bankart Tear Diagnosed?

Your physician will ask about your medical history and perform a thorough physical examination of your shoulder. Your doctor may recommend an additional X-ray or MRI. 

What are the Treatment Options?

Conservative treatment measures for a Bankart tear include rest and immobilization with a sling, followed by physical therapy. 

Bankart repair surgery is indicated for a Bankart tear when conservative treatment measures do not improve the condition but instead results in repeated shoulder joint dislocation.

Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Procedure

Bankart surgery can be performed by a minimally invasive surgical technique called arthroscopy.

  • During an arthroscopic Bankart procedure, your surgeon makes a few small incisions over your shoulder joint. 
  • An arthroscope, a slender tubular device attached with a light and a small video camera at the end is inserted through one of the incisions into your shoulder joint.
  • The video camera transmits the image of the inside of your shoulder joint onto a television monitor for your surgeon to view.
  • Your surgeon then uses small surgical instruments through the other tiny incisions to trim the edges of your glenoid cavity.
  • Suture anchors are then inserted to reattach the detached labrum to the glenoid. The tiny incisions are then closed and covered with a bandage.
  • Arthroscopy causes minimal disruption to the other shoulder structures and does not require your surgeon to detach and reattach the overlying shoulder muscle (subscapularis) as with the open technique. 

 

Postoperative Care for Arthroscopic Bankart Repair 

The following are the postoperative care details following arthroscopic Bankart repair:

  • After your surgery, you will spend about an hour in the recovery room. 
  • Your physical therapist will start you on shoulder exercises the day following your surgery to strengthen and improve the range of motion of your shoulder joint.
  • You will be allowed to perform your daily activities as tolerated, but without lifting objects heavier than a plate or glass, while you heal.
  • Your arm may be placed in a sling for three weeks to restrict the use of your operated shoulder.
  • You may resume light low-risk activities, like jogging and swimming, 8 to 10 weeks after surgery, and may be advised to avoid contact sports for some time.

Risks and Complications of Arthroscopic Bankart Repair

Arthroscopic Bankart repair is a relatively safe procedure. Being minimally invasive, it is associated with fewer risks and a quicker recovery. Some of the potential risks include:

  • Infection
  • Injury to adjacent nerves or blood vessels
  • The stiffness of the joint
  • Pain

 

Shoulder Arthroscopy

Shoulder Anatomy

The shoulder joint is made up of a ball and socket joint, where the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) articulates with the socket of the scapula (shoulder blade), which is called the glenoid. The two articulating surfaces of the bones are covered with cartilage, which prevents friction between the moving bones, enabling smooth movement. Tendons and ligaments around the shoulder joint provide strength and stability to the joint. 

Disease Overview

Injury and disease to the bones or soft tissues of the shoulder joint can make it unstable, and lead to pain, inflammation and reduced mobility. 

What is Shoulder Arthroscopy?

Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive diagnostic and surgical procedure performed for joint problems. Shoulder arthroscopy is performed using a pencil-sized instrument called an arthroscope. The arthroscope consists of a light system and camera that projects images of the surgical site onto a computer screen for your surgeon to clearly view. Arthroscopy is used to treat disease conditions and injuries involving the bones, cartilage, tendons, ligaments, and muscles of the shoulder joint. 

Indications of Shoulder Arthroscopy

Shoulder arthroscopy is indicated to treat the following shoulder conditions when conservative treatment such as medication and therapy fails to relieve pain and disability:

  • Shoulder impingement
  • Rotator cuff tear 
  • Frozen shoulder or stiffness of the shoulder joint 
  • Shoulder instability
  • Biceps rupture 
  • Damaged cartilage or ligaments
  • Bone spurs or bony projections 
  • Arthritis of the collarbone

Shoulder Arthroscopy Procedure

Your surgeon performs shoulder arthroscopy under general or regional anesthesia. You may be positioned lying down on your side with your arm propped up or sitting in a semi-seated position. Sterile fluid is injected into the shoulder joint to expand the surgical area, so your surgeon has a clear view of the damage and room to work. A button-sized hole is made in the shoulder and the arthroscope is inserted. Your surgeon can view images captured by the camera in the arthroscope on a large monitor. Surgical instruments are introduced into the joint through separate small holes to remove and repair the damage to the joint. After surgery, the instruments are removed, and the incisions are closed with stitches or small sterile bandage strips. 

Postoperative Care for Shoulder Arthroscopy

After the surgery, the small surgical wounds take a few days to heal and the surgical dressing is replaced by simple Band-Aids. The recovery time depends on the type and extent of the problem for which the procedure was performed. Pain medications are prescribed to keep you comfortable. The arm of the affected shoulder is placed in a sling for a short period as recommended by your doctor. Physical therapy is advised to improve shoulder mobility and strength after the surgery.

Advantages of Shoulder Arthroscopy

The advantages of arthroscopy compared to open surgery with a large incision include: 

  • Less pain 
  • Fewer complications 
  • Shorter hospital stays
  • Faster recovery

Risks and complications of Shoulder Arthroscopy

Complications of shoulder arthroscopy include infection, bleeding, damage to nearby nerves or blood vessels, or delayed healing after the surgery. In certain cases, a stiffness of the shoulder joint may occur after the surgery. It is important to participate actively in your physical therapy to prevent this from occurring.